+live events

 
 

Black Icons

Join WNYC’s Rebecca Carroll and The Greene Space for a series of insightful and intimate conversations with Black luminaries across the arts, sciences, politics and more, and find out how these notable figures are breaking the rules and changing the game.

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How I Got Over

Join us for a new project reinventing language around race through a series of conversations and performances that explore, express and examine what it means when a social construct becomes the social order. We want people to get personal. We want provocative dialogue. We want to generate new language to execute real change. We want to talk about fear – and how it’s different if you are black or white. We want to hear people explore racism.


Cultural Criticism
in an Era of Deconstructed Whiteness

Join us via live video stream as we discuss the ways to write about art and culture when perspectives are rooted in identity, racial justice and social equality. Do we actively de-center whiteness when we first approach a piece of art? What is a writer’s responsibility to readers and to themselves as cultural critics?

Rebecca Carroll, WNYC’s editor for special projects, leads a panel discussion on race and writing with cultural critics and essayists Fariha Róisín, Antwaun Sargent and E. Alex Jung. 


 

Choosing a School
When Race Matters

Nikole Hannah-Jones and Rebecca Carroll are both black women journalists and working moms with young kids in Brooklyn public schools. They’ve also both reported on racial inequality, school segregation and gentrification in New York City.

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When it came to choosing a school for their kids, they grappled with similar concerns regarding racial inclusion, resources and quality of education. They ended up making very different choices, but together their individual experiences and explanations tell us everything we need to know about how one of the most segregated school systems in the country needs to change.

They are joined by Lucinda Rosenfeld, author of “Class,” a forthcoming novel about race, class and public schools, who also has two daughters in a Brooklyn public school. Come listen in on a candid conversation about integration, diversity and how the culture of our schools reflects the culture of New York City.